Archives for posts with tag: Remembrance

OHspring2Last week I was lucky to be one of 24 students attending an Oral History Spring School at the Institute for Historical Research, the University of London.  It was an intense few days, jam-packed with interesting case studies, ethical questions and differing approaches to collection and analysis. I really enjoyed meeting people from all walks of life – including sociologists, artists, historians and academics – employing the medium of oral history to inspire and further their work. (In particular Paul Thompson, the founding father of Oral History.) The course has renewed my enthusiasm for a subject that’s fascinated me since I was an undergraduate. Over the years I’ve been lucky enough to work on OH projects about a huge range of subjects including Sheffield’s cutlery industry, migration, Yemeni heritage, Salford Quays, military memories, artist’s lives and race relations. Here’s to many more!

Advertisements

071

Fri 14th Oct would have been Ahmed Iqbal Ullah’s 44th birthday. The Legacy project marked the occasion by launching a commemorative exhibition at Manchester Central Library.  In spite of restrictions that meant we couldn’t mark the walls in the Library’s Performance Space, so had to come up with inventive ways to mount and dismantle exhibition material in just one day, we got there! Displays for the event included window panels, banners, cases of archive material, text panels and a book. Around 120 guests attended the event, with speeches delivered by Councillor Lufther Rahman, Selina Ullah and Professor Lou Kushnick.

A smaller display continues in the Lower Ground floor community exhibition space until Jan 2017. To find out more about the Legacy project and The Ahmed Iqbal Education Trust click here.

plotting a grid of 179  pressing the seams

The images above show the coverlet that I’m producing for Imperial War Museum North, to commemorate the beginning of the First World War. On the left is the face (complete with stickers indicating a grid pattern) and on the right the reverse of a patched section. The interlocking shapes are crosses – inspired by designs for Red Cross quilts of the period, made and auctioned to raise funds for the wounded. I’ve been sewing them together by hand, which is a painstaking process. Thank goodness for re-runs of Cagney & Lacey, which keep me going, mid-afternoon!

The overall coverlet design is inspired by RE Farm Cemetery in Belgium, where my great granddad died and is buried. My family discovered the grave a few years ago, re-igniting an interest in the Great War and its ramifications from a personal perspective.

Keep posted for further developments…